Comun Tierra

Uma Exploração de Comunidades Sustentáveis na América Latina.

You are here:

Blog

The Story of Salt

Posted on May, 20 2011

The Story of Salt By Ryan Luckey Easily the most common condiment, found in just about any kitchen anywhere in the world, table salt might also be the most taken for granted. And while we can easily overlook the importance of salt in this era of supermarket ease, we actually know very little about our dependence on this simple substance. Who ever stops to give thanks for their salt, or wonder where it comes from? What would you do if you found out that common table salt, the kind you probably have in a cupboard in your kitchen, is actually a toxic substance that contributes to various major diseases, and is not even vegetarian? Going behind ...

See more...

Universidad de la Tierra! (The Earth University)

Posted on April, 27 2011

Can you imagine: a university that has no pre-requisites? An educational center where you don't take tests or fill out paperwork, and it doesn't cost a dime? A place that offers the same scholastic opportunities for indigenous, mestizos, and foreigners? A school where you learn by doing exactly what you want to? Inside of an educational system based on titles and obligations, norms and standardization, it's almost imposible to imagine, but not inside of the 'free' structure of Uni-Tierra in Oaxaca City, Oaxaca. Universidad de la Tierra, or the Earth University, is a proyect we had the opportunity to visit during our time here in Oaxaca, an open educational space whose objective is ...

See more...

Two new videos up!

Posted on April, 05 2011

What's up world? We are in Oaxaca City, Oaxaca, connecting to various organizations here, and getting a lot of work done! This is just a quick blog to announce two new videos that are up! The first is an interview with long-time activist and Eco-Village/Community organizer Alberto Run Buenfil, filmed in his home at Huehuecoyotl EcoVillage in the state of Morelos, Mexico. Alberto gives several valuable insights for anyone already living in, or hoping to build, an ecovillage, advice from the voice of 40 years experience living in community. The second video is a tour of Raices y Brazos community center in San Jose del Cabo, Baja Sur, Mexico. Raices was literally the first project ...

See more...

Organic Markets in Mexico and The Común Tierra Seed Exchange!

Posted on March, 30 2011

Hello friends! We’re here in Oaxaca, full of activities and preparing to leave Mexico in a few weeks, to cross into Guatemala after almost 11 months here! We want to share a movement that has caught our attention here in Mexico, the Red Nacional de Tianguis Orgánicos or the "National Network of Organic Markets," which is active in the whole country. In this link and in the map below, you can see the size  and scope of the network: Through this organization many producers using sustainable techniques are being supported through fair and direct trade, and the movement is growing every day. And many consumers are opening their eyes (and palates) to the importance ...

See more...

Luna Maya, The sacred power of creation of life

Posted on March, 08 2011

The moment of giving birth is one of the most important in a woman's life: one of the high points in the life of a human being, the fact of bringing a child into the world is by its nature, a transcendent experience. Since ancient times, when there were no hospitals and before Western medicine came to dominate healthcare in society, births were performed by midwives who supported the experience of the mother and father in their own home, within their own cultural framework. Over the years, through the technological advance of Western medicine, birth in the hospital has become the new habit and is now regarded by most of western society ...

See more...

In caravan with BIOTU!

Posted on February, 27 2011

That's the synchronicity of life. Camping outside a restaurant in a small town near the ruins of Calakmul, where we had stopped for a night to organize our way to Chiapas, we couldn’t decide whether to stay one more day or leave. Lacking clarity, we took a break to paint a little outside, when a huge white bus adorned with a huge Quetzalcoatl pulled up in front of the restaurant. It struck us as odd, because this small town had no other tourists around ... But this wasn’t a tourist bus, it was the BioTu project! We had heard of BioTu from several references during out travels in Mexico, a BioDiesel-powered bus ...

See more...

Eco-Pueblito Maya

Posted on January, 28 2011

Peace! It’s late January, and we’re in the Yucatan Peninsula, known internationally for it’s crystal clear Caribbean waters (read: Cancun). It’s also one of several central areas of both the historical and current Mayan society. The area is one of the world’s most visited tourist destinations, with the pristine beaches complemented by intriguing Mayan ruins that receive thousands of visitors daily. In all, the peninsula receives millions of tourists every year, a large majority of whom stop in just for a few days, staying in all-inclusive resorts. Several days ago as we drove away from the coast into less developed areas, we began to pass through small Mayan towns, rich in artesania and ...

See more...

Report back from COP 16 and Klima Forum 2010!

Posted on January, 09 2011

It’s the first week of January, 2011, and we’re in Tulum, Quintana Roo, about 100 km south of Cancun. Cancun is a capitalists dream, and an ecological nightmare. As a city grown from nothing to 700,00 residents in less than 40 years, Cancun’s economy is entirely generated by a very unsustainable form of tourism. One month ago, politicians, indigenous groups, journalists and climate activists from all over the world converged in Cancun for COP 16 to discuss climate change and try to form a plan of action. At the same time, two simultaneous alternative events, Klima Forum and the Via Campesina camp, took place just a few minutes away, as a forum ...

See more...

Support the Huicholes, save the Cerro Quemado!

Posted on December, 21 2010

 (reminder: we live on stolen land…) The diverse indigenous peoples of the Americas had populated these lands for at least 10,000 years before the arrival of European colonizers in the 15th and 16th centuries. The Spanish, English and other European invaders conquered native peoples and appropriated their land and natural resources to build the modern day nation-states that make up Central, South and North America. The surviving indigenous populations today face a diverse range of challenges, and all struggle to maintain their traditional ways in the face of booming capitalism, and government treatment ranging from negligence to harsh intervention and direct oppression. Modern indigenous peoples, marginalized for 500 years on their own land, ...

See more...

New Video: TierrAmor, Permaculture Project in Michoacan, Mexico!

Posted on December, 18 2010

Peace! These last few weeks have kept us busy, as we passed through several Mexican states: Puebla, visiting Ixixtlan, a developing ecovillage, Tlaxcala, where we visited the San Isidro Project, Veracruz, and down to Chiapas. We have info up on these new projects, and a few new videos coming soon. One of them is up already, of the project TierrAmor which we visited back in October, in Erongaricuaro, Michoacan. The video shows a few of the key features of the TierrAmor site, some basic eco-techniques for a more sustainable home, and a great technique integrating chickens and veggie gardens. Here’s the video:   For people all around the world, this time of year is ...

See more...
Copyright © 2010 Común Tierra. All rights reserved. Developed by dzestudio