Comun Tierra

Uma Exploração de Comunidades Sustentáveis na América Latina.

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Reporting on 5 months of Exploring Sustainable Communities in Peru!

Posted on July, 12 2013
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Minhoca in the Andes! Minhoca in the Andes!
Marching against GMO's with Seed Guardians of the Sacred Valley Marching against GMO's with Seed Guardians of the Sacred Valley
Yoga class at Kapievi EcoVillage Yoga class at Kapievi EcoVillage
At Sircadia Project At Sircadia Project
EcoTruly Park! EcoTruly Park!
Machu Picchu! Machu Picchu!
Lunch with volunteers at Refugio Tikabamba Lunch with volunteers at Refugio Tikabamba
Celebrating Alpaca Day in Huancavelica Celebrating Alpaca Day in Huancavelica
With Antonio at Peruvian Permaculture Institute With Antonio at Peruvian Permaculture Institute
Leticia with kids at Eutopia EcoCenter Leticia with kids at Eutopia EcoCenter
Selling coca leaves Selling coca leaves
In the Amaru Indigenous village In the Amaru Indigenous village
Común Tierra at the Tanpu Bio-Market in Sacred Valley, Peru Común Tierra at the Tanpu Bio-Market in Sacred Valley, Peru
Bye bye Peru!! Thanks for everything! Bye bye Peru!! Thanks for everything!

Peru, world famous for it’s ancient Incan ruins, is a country with a large Indigenous population and massive biodiversity. Our time with the Común Tierra Project in Peru brought us through one of the continent’s biggest deserts, up the highest peaks of the trip to date, and into the thick tropical Amazon jungle. Preparing for our time in Peru, we knew we would be fascinated by the ancient cultures still alive and strong today, including the Inca, a powerful civilization with a captivating cosmovision. What we didn’t know was what to expect from the sustainability movement.

On a national level, Peru is experiencing huge economic growth largely based on an extractive economy that exploits the mineral and oil deposits in the country. While more money is flowing, it’s mostly concentrated in the cities, and most rural populations are still poor, with subsistence farming becoming increasingly difficult with the globalization and industrialization of food production and other basic services. On the other hand, we found many people in rural Peru to be incredibly resourceful, as well as conscientious of the value of maintaining their traditional cultures and resisting moving to the big city to pursue capitalism.

One example is the Ccapa family in the Sacred Valley, close to Cusco. After trying chemical agriculture for several years, the family realized their land was losing fertility and they were making less money, so they returned to organic production, and are now building the Kausay Punku EcoCenter to share their experiences with other campesinos in the area, as well as international volunteers.

The Sacred Valley is definitely a hotspot for other alternative projects:

The Seed Guardians of the Sacred Valley are creating a regional seed library and encouraging the protection of the regions incredible edible biodiversity.

Ayahuasca Allyu is a permaculture/spiritual center and home to musician Alonso del Rio, Greta and family.

Refugio Tikabamba is a permaculture and natural building educational center, with founder Javier Bonifaz also very active in the Tanpu Sacred Valley Bio-Market.

And a group of Limeños (meaning people from Lima), after years of working together in social and spiritual projects, are founding the Nuna Ayni intentional community and natural medicine center.

In Quillabamba, a few hours north of the Sacred Vally area, the Sircadia Project is building an off-grid intentional community and meditation center in the rainforest.

But these projects aren’t only in the Sacred Valley. In the Lima area we visited with the Peruvian Permaculture Institute, which has both urban and suburban centers building healthier communities in the city.

Just north of Lima is the EcoTruly Park, a Hare Krishna community and ecotourism destination with beautiful adobe Truly formations.

On the northern coast, the Eutopia EcoCenter is an educational Permaculture project, working primarily with local youth groups and schools in educational projects, while developing appropriate technologies at the EcoCenter.

In the lower Amazon region, outside of Puerto Maldonado, we found the Kapievi EcoVillage, building a long-term ecological community while working to organize ecotourism activities in the region to provide an alternative source of income to preserve the rainforest.

And a neighboring project, the Kerenda Homet Refuge, is an incredible food-forest and private ecological reserve promoting environmental education and action.

Almost all of these projects were conceived of and are run by Peruvians, and with such a rich cultural heritage, it’s no surprise to find such a diverse range of alternative proposals and solutions. See the album above for more photos of our adventures in this amazing country, with more details and stories in our Blog, and definitely contact any of the projects for more information!

Urpillay Sonqollay! (Andean greeting that means "dove of my heart")


Ryan and Leti

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